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United States Air Force Captain Soars to New Highs After Micro ETS Surgery


San Antonio, Texas - For United States Air Force Captain, Tim Lyons, it was more of an annoyance than an hindrance.

“ My hands would be wet and clammy,” Lyons said. “In flight school, my papers were curling up from the wetness dripping from my hands.”

 

Lyons suffers from Hyperhidrosis, excessive sweating of the hands, face, feet and underarm area. Studies show that hyperhidrosis affects over 7.8 million Americans alone. Caused by an over active sympathetic nerve, people with hyperhidrosis experience sweating even in air-conditioned settings.

Lyons, a navigator and stationed in San Antonio, has had this problem for “as long as he can remember.”

“ I think it became more prominent in junior high,” Lyons said. “It wasn’t easy to be sociable with girls with fish hands. It seemed like my hands were always clammy and cold.”

Throughout his junior high and high school years, Lyons attributed his shyness to the problem with his hands. He found ways to cover up his wet palms by making excuses or avoiding social situations.
As Lyons career in the Air Force took flight, Lyons decided to look into his problem.

“ During flights, I could wear gloves to cover the sweating,” Lyons said. “Once in a blue moon, I’d get an occasional shock from the instrument panel in the cockpit because my hands were wet.”

Never formally diagnosed by a doctor, Lyons’ Internet research led him to the diagnosis of hyperhidrosis. He went to his flight surgeon for help.

He tried several treatment options, including Iontophoresis, electroshock therapy for his hands.
“ I went through several treatment options,” Lyons said. “I knew that surgery was the only way to fix this problem.”

The flight surgeon gave Lyons the military option of endoscopic surgery. A surgeon would collapse Lyons lung, and attempt to locate the sympathetic nerve and clamp it.

Uncomfortable about having his lung collapsed and knowing the recovery time would be longer than he could have, Lyons remembered a story about Dr. David Nielson.

Dr. David Nielson, a cardio-thoracic surgeon, revoluntionized endoscopic surgery by creating the Micro Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy. This 30 minute procedure is the least invasive surgery for those suffering from hyperhidrosis. During the procedure, Dr. Nielson makes an incision 1/12 of an inch under each arm. Using microscopic instruments, Dr. Nielson is able to navigate around the lung to the sympathetic nerve. He severs the nerve to instantly treat the excessive sweating. Patients are able to leave the hospital two to four hours later.

Lyons underwent the procedure. He reports that from his sternum to his head, he does not have the excessive sweating and that his feet are dry and warm about 90 percent of the time. Ten days after the surgery, Lyons was deployed to Africa for a three-month mission.

“ I have normal sweating now,” Lyons said. “It is a relief.’

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Please contact us for more information on Wet, Clammy Hand treatment by calling 1-877-837-9379 toll free or submit a questionnaire.


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