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Watch Video - Options to Treat Hyperhidrosis by Dr. Nielson
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Alternative to Surgery for Excessive Sweating Treatment



Alternative Treatments
Primary and secondary hyperhidrosis patients experiencing moderate to severe sweating should try these alternative treatment options before considering surgery.  If you have tried alternative options to treat your excessive sweating and/or blushing and it doesn't resolve, surgery  may be the next step.  The following treatment options should be discussed with your primary care physician.

Antiperspirants (ie, Drysol, Certain Dri )
The first therapeutic measure recommended.  Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate (20-25%) in 70-90% alcohol applied in the evening 2-3 times per week. Less effective over time (within months). High incidence of skin irritation. 10% Glutaraldehyde. Good clinical result in 72 hours. Brown discoloration of the skin occurs. Effective in individuals with light to moderate hyperhidrosis, but not always. Must be repeated regularly for life.

Iontophoresis (Drionic, Hydrex)
Tried, if antiperspirants not effective. Used to treat palmar, axillary, and plantar hyperhidrosis.
Low intensity electric current (15-18 mA) applied to the palms and/or soles immersed in an electrolyte solution.
Has to be repeated regularly, initially in 20 minute sessions several times/week, gradually stretching out the interval between treatments to 1-2 weeks. The results vary: many patients (70%), suffering from light to moderate hyperhidrosis, are happy with the method, some may consider it too time-consuming or inefficient and comparably expensive. It is difficult to apply in axillary, and impossible to use in diffuse hyperhidrosis of the face or the trunk/thigh region. Side effects include: burning, electric shock, discomfort, tingling, skin irritation (erythema and vesicle formation). Sweating returns after cessation.

Medications (Anti-cholinergics - Ditropan, Robinul, Propantheline)
No specific medication to treat hyperhidrosis. Sedative (psychotropic) and/or anti-cholinergic drugs commonly used. Many side-effects. Dry mouth "cotton tongue". Accomodation difficulties of the eyes (hard to focus eyes). Many others. Not generally recommended for treating hyperhidrosis. Low dose anti-cholinergic agents may decrease excess sweating without causing incapacitating side-effects in those few individuals who suffer only from profuse truncal sweating. A dosage necessary to normalize the amount of sweating is rarely tolerated.

Botulinus toxin (Botox injections)
Produced by a bacteria known as Clostridium botulinum, this toxin is one of the most lethal poisons known. This toxin interfers with the neurotransmitter acethylcholine at the synapses (nerve junction points). Progressive paralysis of all muscles in the body develops. Botulinus toxin given in extremely low doses has been used to treat localized muscle hyperactivity such as lid spasms and torticollis. Side effects include: dry mouth, bladder paralysis, bowel inactivity, and others. Repeat injections are frequently required every 1 to 6 months.

Hypnosis
Individuals who have tried hypnosis for palmar hyperhidrosis have reported little improvement.

Lasertherapy
Some desperate patients have tried this technique. This technique involves direct irradiation of the palms which results in 3rd degree burns of the hands without any improvement in sweating.

Radiotherapy
High-dose radiation to treat axillary hyperhidrosis. Serious dermatitis and skin retraction develops.

Psychotherapy (Limited effect in the majority of patientS)
Psychological problems commonly develop as a consequence of hyperhidrosis, not the other way around. Psychiatric or psychopharmacologic therapy may help an individual to cope with hyperhidrosis condition, but certainly won't treat the disorder.

Additional Alternative Treatment Methods
Alternative Medicine, Homoeopathy, Massage, Acupuncture, Phytotherapeutic (Herbal) drugs. These methods are hard to document improvement.

Axillary Sweat Gland Removal
Z-plasty excision of the axillary sweat glands. Hypertrophic and/or constrictive scars may sometimes form restricting shoulder motion.

Please contact us for more information on hyperhidrosis by calling 1-877-837-9379 toll free or submit a questionnaire.


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